Lands Down Under (Day 8)

January 18

Tasmania

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[Arriving in Burnie, a small port city on the north coast of Tasmania with a metro population of about 27,000.]

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[When we disembarked, we were all met by a woman handing out “Burnie” pins.  Turns out she was the mayor, Anita Dow.  Totally shirking my cub reporting duties, I forgot to take her picture.  This one’s from the “www.”]

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[Well, if the mayor is handing me a city pin, it’s going on my hat!]

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[A short bus ride (it could have been a walk, but again, it’s a working port so it’s verboten) to the city, technically to Makers’ Workshop (and information center) from whence to begin daily operations.  I found this university sign and wondered if they’re the Tasmania Fighting Tasmanian Devils?]

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[Reetz explores the facilities.]

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[Followed by a bus ride to the city overlook . . . ]

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[The Biddies each get their shots.]

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[Lumber is a major export product of both Australia and New Zealand, going mainly to South and East Asia.]

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[Ground plaques, always a major photo op.]

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[Are we back in West Central Minnesota?]

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[The first and main tour destination – it’s internationally-renowned, we’re told.]

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[Our group models . . . modeling.]

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[And here we go for a walk over the 11 hectare (2 1/2 acres per hectare) gardens.]

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[Artsy shot of tall trees.]

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[The Super finds some flowers . . . ]

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[As does Bert.]

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[There are literally thousands of varieties of rhododendron – over 22,000 in this garden alone.  They are a very close relative to the azalea.  We’re here in summer and the blooming season is spring – so we just missed it by a month or so.]

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[Looking back up at the welcome center.]

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[Argghhhh!  I forgot to check to see if this was a Continental Bridge.  Sure looks like one.]

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[Like a Japanese garden.]

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[The Flowering Biddies – hydrangeas, I believe.]

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[Oh, that Aussie sense of humor!]

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[With our garden guide, Pete Stratford (I know that because in an upcoming photo you can read his name tag), in a volunteer-made gazebo.]

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[A lovely setting, if I do say so myself.]

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[The Super in the covered bridge . . . ]

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[The aforementioned covered bridge.]

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[Plants]

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[More plants, with the gazebo in the background.]

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[The gazebo and the covered bridge all in one incredible shot!]

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[It must be some sort of Tasmanian word?]

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[On the road again . . . ]

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[To this destination.]

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[A really big tree – eucalyptus, I believe.]

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[A tree parasite.]

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[As we begin our trail walk, signs of a relatively recent flood in the river.]

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[Keep an eye out for a platypus.  Nope, unfortunately never saw one.]

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[Another parasitic tree.]

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[Reetz and Kathy read about what they’re looking at.]

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[Onward – ferns abound.]

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[The gang enjoys another scenic overlook.]

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[This selfie was designed to include the Super and the entire background.  Close-up setting instead of wide angle.  Well, it could always be used as an ad for using sunscreen, as I’m peeling like an old onion.]

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[Kinda what I was looking for the first time – except the Super is holding a “stuffed” platypus.]

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[Reetz plays a little solitaire waiting for our ride at the end of the hike.]

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[And now back at the Makers’ Workshop for a little lunch – not unlike SAWA’s wine lovers platter.  Yummy!]

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The Supervisor’s Section

[The Super and Reetz are into crafting and gardening.  Thus, it only seems fair they get a whole section for their photos beginning in Makers’ Workshop, where folks work on their arts and crafts, i.e., “make” things . . . ]

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[And her port shots . . . ]

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[And her spouse shot.]

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[Flowers!]

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[Sniff!]

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[More flowers . . . ]

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[Pete and the folks in the gazebo.]

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[There’s that funny Tasmanian word again?]

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[The aforementioned Mr. Stratford and his name tag.  And he wrote a book:  Why I Sit Like This … …: The Poetry of Pete Stratford.  The Super bought a copy and had him sign it for Jami and Danny.]

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[Saying good-bye to Burnie.]

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Stop ye travellers as you pass by; As you are now, so once was I; As I am now, soon you shall be – Prepare yourself to follow me.  Graffiti response:  To follow you; I am not content – – How do I know; Which way you went?  ~  Tombstone epitaph in Tasmania

About tomobert63

The Journey Begins Thanks for joining me! This is the follow-up to the original, “alexandriacardinals.wordpress.com,” which overwhelmed the system’s ability to handle it any more. Thus, this is “Part 2.” As the original was initially described: 10-26-07-4 “It all began in a 5,000 watt radio station in Fresno, California” . . . wait a minute, that was Ted Baxter on the Mary Tyler Moore Show! Let’s see . . . oh yeah, it all began in 2003 when retirees, i.e., old people, in Alexandria, Minnesota, who had no desire to become snow birds, went looking for mid-winter entertainment here in the frozen tundra of West Central Minnesota. We discovered girls’ high school hockey, fell in love immediately, and it remains our favorite spectator sport to this day. Initially, and for several years, reports on these games were e-mailed to those who were actually snowbirds but wanted to keep abreast of things “back home.” It was ultimately decided a blog would be more efficient, and it evolved into a personal diary of many things that attracts tens of readers on occasion. It remains a source of personal mental therapy and has yet to elicit any lawsuits. ~ The Editor, May 9, 2014 p.s. The photo border around the blog is the Cardinal girls’ hockey team after just beating Breck for the state championship in 2008. It’s of the all-tournament team. The visible Breck player on the left is Milica McMillen, then an 8th-grader – she is now an All-American for the Gophers. The Roseau player in the stocking cap I believe is Mary Loken, who went on to play for UND; and the Cardinal player on the right, No. 3, is Abby Williams, the player we blame most for making us girls’ hockey fans who went on to play for Bemidji State. *********************************************************************************** Photos contained herein are available for personal use. All you have to do is double click on any of the photos and they will become full screen size. You can then save them into your personal “My Pictures” file. They make lovely parting or hostess gifts, or holiday gifts for such as Uncle Ernie who wants to see how his grand niece is doing on the hockey team. If any are sold for personal profit, however, to, for example, the Audubon Society, National Geographic, Sven’s Home Workshop Monthly, Curling By The Numbers, or the World Wrestling Federation, I only request that you make a donation to the charitable organization of your choice. You have two hours and fifteen minutes. Pencils ready? Begin! **********************************************************************************
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